Tag Archives: Coaching

Premier Skills Phase 2 training kicks off in India

British Council, Football, Kerala, Thrivananthapuram, Premier League, Goa, SAI, LNCPE, Referee, Coaching, Coaches, Fulham, Aston Villa, Tottenham, ScudamoreThe second phase of the hugely successful Premier Skills initiative, run by the Premier League and the British Council will take place from 2 to 7 November 2015 in Thiruvananthapuram, Keralaat Lakshmibai National College of Physical Education (LNCPE).

 

Premier Skills is a partnership between the Premier League and the British Council. It uses football as a tool to help develop both community coaching and English language skills. The programme trains sports coaches, referees and youth leaders, enhancing their existing football skills, whilst also developing their leadership skills and a greater understanding of the role football can play in tackling other social issues.

 

In November 2014, for the Phase 1 training, coaches and referees of the Premier Skills Kolkata Goalz programme, belonging to Kerala Football Association, Goa Football Association, Sports Authority of India, and three NGOs, were trained at Sports Authority of India (SAI) and Lakshmibai National College of Physical Education (LNCPE), Kerala. Phase 2 consists of two training programmes: Coach Education (2 – 7 November 2015) and Referee Development (2 – 4 November 2015). The coach education programme will be attended by 36 Indian coaches and 24 Indian referees will participate in the referee programme. These coaches and referees (from Goa and Kerala) have been chosen from the Phase 1 participants.British Council, Football, Kerala, Thrivananthapuram, Premier League, Goa, SAI, LNCPE, Referee, Coaching, Coaches, Fulham, Aston Villa, Tottenham, Scudamore

 

During the programme, the coaches and referees will receive training from qualified Premier Skills coaches, giving them the skills and support to develop their own community football projects and development as referees and coaches. The coaches’ training programme will be led by experienced Premier Skills Head Coach Jeremy Weeks supported by Robert Perret, Sports Development Manager with Crystal Palace FC Foundation and Cheryl Edwards, Community Coach at Aston Villa Football Club. The referee training programme will be led by Graham Laws, Referee Coach at Professional Game Match Officials Limited supported by Michael Edward Murphy, Assistant Referee Coach.

The training will end with a demonstration of skills that the coaches and referees have learnt over the course of the programme. This will be showcased on Friday 6 November and Sunday 7 November, at SAI, LNCPE, Thiruvananthapuram.

 

The course in Thiruvananthapuram is being jointly organised by the British Council and Premier League in association with Sports Authority of India (SAI), Lakshmibai National College of Physical Education, All India Football Federation (AIFF), Kerala Football Association (KFA) and Goa Football Association (GFA).

 

In addition to coaching, a range of free materials, including a dedicated website, has been created under Premier Skills for teachers and learners of English that utilise exciting Premier League content and the British Council’s world-class expertise in English.

Premier League Executive Chairman, Richard Scudamore, said:

“I am thrilled that Premier Skills will return to India this week for Phase 2 of the project. In the UK, Premier League clubs have a long-held commitment to investing in and supporting local community and education programmes and that is now being mirrored internationally, with Premier Skills operating in 25 countries. Given the increasing interest in football in India we are proud to support the country’s growing enthusiasm for the sport by providing more highly trained coaches and referees to pass on their expertise through Premier Skills.”

 

Mei-kwei Barker, Director, British Council South India said

“We are delighted to present Premier Skills, Phase 2 training programme, our very successful partnership project with the Premier League in South India. It combines English and football, two universal languages and with the support of our local partners in India — Sports Authority of India (SAI), Lakshmibai National College of Physical Education, All India Football Federation (AIFF), Kerala Football Association (KFA) and Goa Football Association (GFA) — we have been able to provide this opportunity. As part of Phase 2 training, the Coach Education and Referee Development programmes will be attended by successful coaches and referees from Phase 1 of the project. We hope the coaches and referees find this training useful and are able to make the most impact in their respective communities”.

 

The Programme

 

Coach Education Programme: 2 – 7 November 2015

The Coach Education curriculum aims to develop a group of local master trainers at the end of the programme. It will help to develop community coach skills and knowledge. The training will be in three parts, over 18 – 24 months and involves attendance at and graduation from each part of the training. There will be learning and practical tasks that must be completed between each of the training. Those that are successful will need to demonstrate continued progress throughout the 3 Phases and with the tasks that they will be asked to complete between the training phases. Successful Phase 3 Graduates will become Premier Skills Coach Educators – and they will have an opportunity to train and develop new Premier Skills Community Coaches to support the work of their organisation.

 

Referee Development programme: 2 – 4 November 2014

The Referee Development programme is a two phase programme which offers participants an introduction to refereeing at grassroots level. Participants include referees that are already working in community football programmes but who have received minimal or no formal training to improve their refereeing skills and knowledge.

For more on Premier Skills visit http://www.britishcouncil.org/society/sport/current-programmes/premier-skills.

AFC goalkeeping certificate course in Maharashtra

AFCAccording to reports from Manipur, AIFF will be conducting an AFC Goalkeeping Level 1 Certificate Course from February 15 to 20 in Maharashtra.

Candidate can apply online by logging onto AIFF Website within December 31 and register for the course.

Source : AFC goalkeeping certificate course

AFC ‘C’ License Course to be conducted in Kochi

AFC, Football, India, Kerala, Coaching, License, AFC, Asian Football Confederation, Kerala Football Association, KFAAIFF will be conducting ‘C’ License course in Kochi from 10th   to 22nd  February 2015. Interested ‘D‘ License holders can apply online by logging on to AIFF website  https://www.the-aiff.com/coach-education.htm

Click Apply Now, under the Become a Coach section.

The last date to apply online will be  31st December 2014.

Premier Skills programme concludes in Kerala

Premier Skills, British Council, Football, Kerala, Thrivananthapuram, Premier League, Goa, SAI, LNCPE, Referee, Coaching, Coaches, Fulham, Aston Villa, Tottenham, ScudamoreThe hugely successful Premier Skills initiative, run by the Premier League and the British Council launched at 10 AM on Monday, 24th November 2014 at SAI LNCPE concluded with a Grand Community Football Festival. Premier Skills is a partnership between the British Council and Premier League.Premier Skills, British Council, Football, Kerala, Thrivananthapuram, Premier League, Goa, SAI, LNCPE, Referee, Coaching, Coaches, Fulham, Aston Villa, Tottenham, Scudamore

 

The course in Thiruvananthapuram was jointly organised by the British Council and Premier League in association with Sports Authority of India (SAI), Lakshmibai National College of Physical Education (LNCPE), All India Football Federation (AIFF), Kerala Football Association (KFA) and Goa Football Association (GFA) from 24th to 30th November 2014. The participants in the programme have been selected from the Football associations as well as from a number of NGOs, including Special Olympics, Cequin, Oscar Foundation and World Vision.

Premier Skills,,British Council, Football, Kerala, Thrivananthapuram, Premier League, Goa, SAI, LNCPE, Referee, Coaching, Coaches, Fulham, Aston Villa, Tottenham, Scudamore

The Coaches and referees have got opportunity to train themselves from qualified Premier Skills coaches, got the skills and support to develop their own community football projects and development as referees. The UK referee trainers held a referee symposium event on 27th November. The Symposium provided the opportunity for the Premier Skills referees to experience the knowledge and understanding from national referees, referee instructors and the premier skills coaches to further enhance their knowledge and learning. The Symposium was a mixture of presentations on laws of the game, recognizing foul challenges, handball, player management and mass confrontation. The participants were fully involved in the very interactive symposium and also provided an opportunity to share knowledge and best practice ideas.

Premier Skills, British Council, Football, Kerala, Thrivananthapuram, Premier League, Goa, SAI, LNCPE, Referee, Coaching, Coaches, Fulham, Aston Villa, Tottenham, Scudamore

The Training programme was followed by a Football Festival with the participation of Children between the age group of 10 – 12. 100 children of participated in the community football festival on 30-11-2014.

Premier Skills, British Council, Football, Kerala, Thrivananthapuram, Premier League, Goa, SAI, LNCPE, Referee, Coaching, Coaches, Fulham, Aston Villa, Tottenham, ScudamoreThe following were the luminaries and faculties imparted knowledge to the participants.

Mr. Jermy Weeks has the expertise in Coaching Community and Academy departments of Exeter City FC. He was the Head Soccer Coach at Lake Owego Sports Camp in Pennsylvania, USA. Jez Weeks joined Fulham FC and worked for Fulham FC Foundation as Sports Development Officer in London Area. He was also coaching for the Academy and Girl’s Centre of Excellence and has become the Acting Sports Development Manager in 2009 managing all the football, sport and health related development projects across London and Surrey. Jez joined the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Organising Committee where he was the Paralympic Football Competition Manager. He was involved in the Olympic Football competition across the UK and Olympic Park.

In Premier Skills Programme he is involved in the development of the syllabus for Premier Skills Phase 2 and currently runs his own Sports Consultancy Company called W 10 and provides on-going support to the development of the premier Skills Programme.

Corinne Mitchel is currently a Coach Educator at the Girls Centre of Excellence and work with all coaches and players from the age of 9-17.   She currently hold a UEFA B in coaching football and have a PTLLs award in tutoring adults. She has participated in the FA Women’s Mentoring Scheme also and holds UEFA A License.

Mr. Daniel Landstorm is a graduate in Science and Football at Liverpool John Mores University. He has achieved UEFA B Coaching qualification and gained experience of coaching around the world working in countries such as the USA, Sudan, China and Abu Dhabi. Now he is engaged in the role of Football and Multi Sport Manager overseeing all aspects of community football including Disability Sports, School Sports, Women and Girls Football and Premier League4Sport

Mr. Daniel Slaughter is currently managing five regional disability football centre of excellence programmes for FA and Tottenham Hotspur Foundation. He has engaged in managed a team of coaches and developing a technical coaching programme working from the same beliefs as the Tottenhjam Hotspur Academy and England Disability Playing/Coaching philosophies. He hold UEFA B Licence, FA Youth Modules One and two and working his FA Youth Coaching Award.

Kelvin Chee is a Learning and Development Consultant and Trainer. He is a man with a vision to impact the children in his community using football. He is a Coach Educator in Malaysia with Level I Certification from Premier Skills. He is now serving as a Volunteer Coach for Matrix Community Football Club in Tman Sea Petaling Jaya.

To find out more about the football-focused English content and to view the materials online, visit http://premierskills.britishcouncil.org/

 

British Council’s Premier Skills Program Kicks off in Kerala

British Council, Football, Kerala, Thrivananthapuram, Premier League, Goa, SAI, LNCPE, Referee, Coaching, Coaches, Fulham, Aston Villa, Tottenham, ScudamoreThe hugely successful Premier Skills initiative, run by the Premier League and the British Council was launched on Monday 24 November 2014 in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India.

Premier Skills will take place from 24 to 30 November 2014. The training will be held at Sports Authority of India Lakshmibai National College of Physical Education, Kariavattom P.O.; Thiruvananthapuram 695581, Kerala.

British Council, Football, Kerala, Thrivananthapuram, Premier League, Goa, SAI, LNCPE, Referee, Coaching, Coaches, Fulham, Aston Villa, Tottenham, ScudamoreThis is the first phase of a three-phase training programme for coaches and two-phase training programme for referees in Thiruvananthapuram.

Premier Skills is a partnership between the British Council and the Premier League. It uses football as a tool to help develop both community coaching and English language skills. The programme trains sports coaches, referees and youth leaders to return to their own communities and enhance their existing football sessions, whilst also developing their leadership skills and a greater understanding of the role football can play in tackling other social issues.

The coach education programme will be led by head coach Jeremy Weeks, who was a senior coach at Fulham FC till May 2011 which he left to join the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Organising Committee (LOCOG) where he was the Paralympic Football Competition Manager. He will be supported by Corinne Mitchell, community coach from Aston Villa Football Club, Daniel Landstrom from City in the Community Foundation of Manchester City Football Club, Daniel Slaughter, Inclusion Development Manager at Tottenham Hotspur Football Club and Kelvin Chee a Premier Skills community coach educator from Malaysia.

The referee development programme will be led by Ray Olivier, Training & Development Manager for the Professional Game Match Officials and responsible for the training and development of Premier League and Football League referees and Assistant Referees in England. He will be supported by Keren Barratt, Select Group Referee Manager for the Professional Game Match Officials.

The course in Thiruvananthapuram is being jointly organised by the British Council and Premier League in association with Sports Authority of India (SAI), Lakshmibai National College of Physical Education, All India Football Federation (AIFF), Kerala Football Association (KFA) and Goa Football Association (GFA).

British Council, Football, Kerala, Thrivananthapuram, Premier League, Goa, SAI, LNCPE, Referee, Coaching, Coaches, Fulham, Aston Villa, Tottenham, Scudamore

Participants in the programme have been selected from the Football associations as well as from a number of NGO’s, including Special Olympics, Cequin, Oscar Foundation and World Vision.

The coaches and referees will receive training from qualified Premier Skills coaches, giving them the skills and support to develop their own community football projects and development as referees.

In addition to the training, the UK referee trainers will hold a referee symposium event on 27 November.

As of 2013, Premier Skills has trained 2,500 coaches and referees in 25 countries across Asia, Africa and the Americas, who in turn have reached a further 550,000 young people. By 2016 it aims to train a further 3,000 coaches and referees and through them reach more than 300,000 young people.

British Council, Football, Kerala, Thrivananthapuram, Premier League, Goa, SAI, LNCPE, Referee, Coaching, Coaches, Fulham, Aston Villa, Tottenham, ScudamoreIn addition to coaching, a range of free materials, including a dedicated website, have been created under Premier Skills for teachers and learners of English that utilise exciting Premier League content and the British Council’s world-class expertise in English.

Premier League Chief Executive Richard Scudamore said:

“At home the Premier League and our Clubs have a long-held commitment and reputation for delivering high quality community and education programmes. Given our popularity internationally we felt it only right to take this approach to a wider community.

“Premier Skills has already taken place in 25 countries, including in India where we have run coach development projects in Delhi and Kolkata and are heavily involved in the ground-breaking Kolkata Goalz project, which has over 1,000 young people involved a week in its activities. I am thrilled that we are now rolling Premier Skills rolling out in India this week.”

Ms Mei-kwei Barker, Director, British Council South India said, “We are delighted to introduce Premier Skills, our very successful partnership project with the Premier League, to South India. It combines English and football, two universal languages and with the support of our local partners in India — Sports Authority of India (SAI), Lakshmibai National College of Physical Education, All India Football Federation (AIFF), Kerala Football Association (KFA) and Goa Football Association (GFA) — we have been able to provide this opportunity. We hope the coaches and referees find this training useful and we are able to bring more such programmes here over the next few years.”

The Programme

Coach Education Programme: 24 – 30 November 2014

The Coach Education curriculum aims to develop a group of local master trainers at the end of the programme. It will help to develop community coach skills and knowledge. The training will be in three parts, over 18 – 24 months and involves attendance at and graduation from each part of the training. There will be learning and practical tasks that must be completed between each of the training. Those that are successful will need to demonstrate continued progress throughout the 3 Phases and with the tasks that they will be asked to complete between the training phases. Successful Phase 3 Graduates will become Premier Skills Coach Educators – and they will have an opportunity to train and develop new Premier Skills Community Coaches to support the work of their organisation.

Referee Development programme: 24 – 26 November 2014

The Referee Development programme is a two phase programme which offers participants an introduction to refereeing at grassroots level. Participants include referees that are already working in community football programmes but who have received minimal or no formal training to improve their refereeing skills and knowledge.

Referee symposium: 27 November 2014

The symposium will be a mixture of interactive presentations designed to provide a modern update in both referee and assistant referee skills. The sessions will also be helpful for instructors and assessors to use the material for further developing their referees in their communities. Included in the presentations will be looking at the following training topics:

  1. Critical Incidents and Communication
  2. Recognising Foul Challenges
  3. Offside Situations and Interpretation
  4. Positioning & Movement
  5. Referee & Assistant Referee Cooperation

To find out more about the football-focused English content and to view the materials online, visit http://premierskills.britishcouncil.org/

Tiki-Taka with Stevie Grieve

Stevie Grieve, Coach Education, Baichung Bhutia Football Schools, Garhwal FC, Football, Delhi, Interview, Scotland, Coaching, 2nd Division I-league, Dhanbad, Gangtok

We recently caught up with Stevie Grieve – Head of Coach Education at Baichung Bhutia Football Schools and the Assistant Manager of Garhwal FC to talk about various topics ranging from his experience in India, the level of coaching and infrastructure in the country and the kind of talent he comes across in the country.

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You have been here in India for more than 6 months, apart from the football scene, what do you like about India and what do you find challenging?

I like the enthusiasm towards getting better, most of the time I will be working to develop the coach education programs for BB Football Schools. And in this short period of time there is a massive improvement. That for me is a really pleasing thing.

The cultural mentality is a bit challenging. You have an hierarchy system – ‘I am better than you because I have this job and I am better than you because of that’ and so on. The challenge then is to get people to think differently.

Before the stint in India you have coached in Switzerland, and USA, how easy was it for you to choose India as your next destination?

Anurag, who is the boss, one of the bosses in fact, emailed me about my books and at the same time, we were talking about the possibility of working  in India. I was talking to couple more of people as well. I could have gone to Japan and other countries but I liked Anurag’s vision, what he wanted to achieve over the short term and long term, and I was enthused with what he wanted me to do. I trusted them, their idea for the future, and I am excited to be a part of it.

Now, coming to football…How is your assignment with Bhaichung Bhutia Football Schools panning out? What are the main areas you look in to as a chief coach in BB Schools?

Most of my time is spent developing the coaches. For example, we have field trainings Stevie Grieve, Coach Education, Baichung Bhutia Football Schools, Garhwal FC, Football, Delhi, Interview, Scotland, Coaching, 2nd Division I-league, Dhanbad, Gangtok everyday across multiple locations in Delhi, my job would be to go and monitor the sessions, ask questions to the coaches, look at the session plans and provide feedback on things that could appear in the session or make slight alterations to the practices, check how the trainings are organized, talk to them about how to make it more challenging or easy etc.

I try to get the coach as much help and information and work with them in separate training sessions. I took a session today on footwork and combination which developed into a counter attacking session, which was quite good.

Most of my time is spent mentoring the coaches but I do coach certain teams as the assistant coach, and on the game day I help the team coach with tactics etc as I am the BBFS Head Coach, so I am pretty much an auxiliary assistant coach at sessions & matches, there to provide some guidance and help the lead coach perform their work better.

I have also made a 3 stage coach education program to work in ‘The BBFS Way’ which we have just started our 1st level 1 course with 24 coaches, which has been received brilliantly.

How was the experience of taking Garhwal FC to the 2nd Div league? How do you assess your team’s performance in the 2nd div league?

I think the 2nd div league could be a lot better organized.  They could have done it on a football pitch than on a cricket pitch! Organizational wise, I don’t think Dhanbad was a suitable venue for a football tournament, especially with the high pollution and lack of quality training venues. Gangtok may be fine as it’s a football area but im not sure Dhanbad is.

From a coaching point of view, Garhwal’s performance was fantastic. We were written off by the leading sources in Indian Football initially, probably quite fairly, to be honest. We have not achieved anything so far with Garhwal FC in professional football, it was last season we won the Delhi Senior League and this season we were 30 seconds from winning the league again, but have no history in National Level Pro Football.

The media predictions were used as a source of motivation and performance wise we were excellent in the 3 games we won. In the games we lost, the Wahingdoh match was a shocker and the conditions for the Kalighat game was very bad, especially for a team who play possession football – The field was almost a swamp! In the other matches, we did put on a good show with our exciting style of play and emerged 3rd best in that group which was deserved.

Everybody is quite happy and across the country we deserve some appreciation because not every year does a new club join a league and have the relative success that we had with a 60% wins ratio, with an average of 2 goals a game.

Infrastructure is an area that gets talked about a lot when we talk about football in India. What is your opinion about what you have seen so far in India?

In terms of developing sporting infrastructure, India is a nation where temperatures soar really high, if you see Europe there are indoor facilities that help beating the cold. India could focus on creating more indoor venues, where other version of the game like Futsal could also be played.  We also need to invest on 4g astro-turfs as its better for players to play on flat fields than on bumpy grounds.

If that is not possible, we need to have good education for groundsmen. For example, BBFS hire fields for our BBFS sessions, when you arrive there you see a groundsman standing with a hose, full flow on the same patch for hours, before its about to be used! So the field gets damaged because of that so we need to educate people who can create or maintain grass facilities.

Are Astro turfs good for players?

Stevie Grieve, Coach Education, Baichung Bhutia Football Schools, Garhwal FC, Football, Delhi, Interview, Scotland, Coaching, 2nd Division I-league, Dhanbad, Gangtok I think we need to have more astro turfs. It is hard to grow grass, in some parts of the country. I have only been to Jharkhand, Delhi and Chandigarh, so I really can’t comment about the whole country. In a country where it is difficult to maintain facilities, including educating grounds-keepers and also considering the weather, laying 3 or 4 G astro-turfs is a more feasible possibility as they are easy to maintain and would last longer.  You get better quality out of that surface unlike a bouncy, wobbly natural surface. You can coach as much of technique on an astro turf, it is much easier.  I think in long term to develop technique and an attractive playing style, we need to have good astro-turfs.

Do you follow I-league? If so, what is your opinion on the standards of I-league? What could be the areas the league could look to improve?

Yes, I do follow some matches. But I cannot claim that I pay full attention to the league. I know that the Scottish player Darryl Duffy has done quite well in the league.  The matches I have seen, I would say probably not much of tactics are involved. The matches are direct,  straight and is pretty easy to predict what is going on, mainly due to the technical level of the players. In the matches that I have watched, I haven’t seen a coach shifting from a 4-4-2 to 4-2-3-1, to get the team attack from the middle, to attack specific areas via making diagonal attacks from center and so on.

At Garwhal FC, we worked on attacking/defending specific areas in the 2nd div league and that got us 3 wins. It doesn’t look like it happens in the I-league and it baffles me when I watch the games, the lack of tactical awareness in the matches. Im not trying to be disrespectful to anyone, but the results of seeing the games leads me to this opinion.

I also think there is not many young Indian players playing. I haven’t noticed many. I think there is an over emphasis on big, strong powerful players and that means you have a lot Africans, particularly from Nigeria. Watched Odafa the other day, I believe he is the highest paid in India but he was not of the standard of a good British semi-professional footballer on that day.

So I take from the games I have watched of him, that we are wasting a lot of money on players who are not possibly so good for the money you pay them – you wouldn’t pay a shop assistant 3 lakh per month! So the money needs to be spent better on the players who provide quality.

We need to start identifying better players and also implement a coaching philosophy and stick to it. For the money the clubs spend today, on some players, you could get 3 good players from Spain. It is also not that all the players are bad, but an infusion of little bit of tactical nous could improve the league for better, and unearth some of the talent that exists in India.

India is slated to host the 2017 U-17 WC. As a coach who is involved in grassroots football, what do you make out of Indian Youngsters and where do they need to improve?

The first aspect that we need to look at, is to improve the level of technique. To do that, we need to improve coaches who can teach technique. That is what we do at BBFS and Garwhal FC. But despite the lack of proper coaching, there are good players in the country. I see so many special talents in this country. For example, Garwhal FC played Minlun Tunglung, who is just 16,in the 2nd div league. He was the best player on the pitch in the last game. So, there will be special talents across the nation, the difficult part is to find them and nurture them by providing good coaching facilities. With better coach education and talent identification (if the correct age) there is a good possibility that India will make a rapid rise in the FIFA Rankings in 10 years.

What opinion do you have about the levels of coaching in the country? How integral is it to provide good education to coaches for the development of football?

Massive! Massive!

Take Japan for example. Twenty years ago, they would have been around 150 in the FIFA rankings (where India are now). They invested massively in grassroots coach education,which then developed into professional youth coach education and so on. This greatly helped the J-League and Japan’s football.

Stevie Grieve, Coach Education, Baichung Bhutia Football Schools, Garhwal FC, Football, Delhi, Interview, Scotland, Coaching, 2nd Division I-league, Dhanbad, Gangtok If India could devise a coach education pathway of its own, apart from the AFC A, B, C licenses that are the current norm, it would bring about massive changes. For a country of India’s size, it should have a National coaching pathway which is tailored to Indian conditions. I believe, this can bring about drastic changes in coaching quality which improves the talent output.

You have also authored quite a few books. A book on Sergio Busquets, another one on 4-2-3-1 formation. What is your inspiration to author so much? Can we expect a book on your experience India in some time?

If I make it big and write an autobiography, there will be quite a few pages dedicated to India! It’s been a great experience and I’ve seen and done some things that will stay with me for life.

Now, some personal questions – Do you have any favorite teams in World Football?

St. Johnstone F.C. , it is a small Scottish Club. Clubs that I love to watch are Arsenal, Dortmund, Barcelona, Roma and Bayern Munich.

Apart from Football and authoring, do you pursue any other interests?

I like to go to see music concerts, play poker, normal stuff! This week I will be watching Wolfmother at the Hard Rock Cafe. Otherwise, I am happy to visit museums, QutubMinar and other touristy places. Im also learning Spanish, Russian and Italian, which I enjoy doing.

So Stevie, few words on Football News India. You follow us on Twitter. Are we able to cater a regular dose of football news from India?

It is good,I think it is the best one I have seen on the internet for Indian Football. It is unbiased, it is informative and gives you up-to-date information. So, well played! Good one there!

AFC A License Course to be held in Kerala

AFCAFC A License Course course will be held in Thiruvanthapuram, Kerala. The course will start on October 18th and will go on till November 16th.

Team India technical director Rob Baan and Mr. Vincent Subramanium from Asian Football Confederation (AFC) will be conducting the course. Coaches from all over India is expected to take part in the course.

The candidates selected for the same are as follows:

Luis Mario Aguiar, Levino Pereira and Lino Pereira (Goa); Narayana Menon, Xavier Pious, P.K. Rajeev, V.P. Shaji, Bino George, Jo Paul Ancheri (Kerala); Gautam Ghosh, Satyabrata Bhowmick, Bastab Roy; Achinta Kumar Belel and Anita Sarkar (West Bengal); Kamalkanta Singh (Assam); John Kenneth Raj and C. Ravi Kumar (Karnataka); Arindam Biswas (Pondicherry); N. William Koso and Roko Angami (Nagaland); Bitan Singh and Surmala Chanu (Manipur); Bobby Nongbet (Meghalaya); Mita Michiteru (Japan).

With inputs from AIFF Media article from : http://www.the-aiff.com